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UT-Led Team Working on Improved Hydrocephalus Treatment

Stephanie TerMaath, the Jessie Rogers Zeanah Faculty Fellow in the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Biomedical Engineering.

Stephanie TerMaath, the Jessie Rogers Zeanah Faculty Fellow in the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Biomedical Engineering.

A team of researchers led by Stephanie TerMaath, UT’s Jessie Rogers Zeanah Faculty Fellow, is making promising strides in the treatment of hydrocephalus, a debilitating and sometimes fatal condition caused by an excess of cerebrospinal fluid surrounding the brain and spinal cord, by engineering an alternative to a device currently used to relieve symptoms.

“There’s no cure for hydrocephalus right now, only treatment of the effects through a surgically implanted device called a shunt,” said TerMaath, of the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Biomedical Engineering. “Unfortunately shunts have a high rate of failure, requiring more surgeries for revision. We’re developing a new ventricular catheter that will be more resistant to obstruction, a common cause of shunt failure.”

Cerebrospinal fluid provides immune support, regulates circulation, and cushions the head and spine. However, if that fluid fails to be absorbed naturally or if an excess is produced, it can cause severe problems with vision, coordination, and mental abilities, and, if left untreated, can lead to death.

Learn more at news.utk.edu.

Recognitions, October 17

In Memoriam: Ed Cortez, Former Director of SIS

Ed Cortez, professor emeritus and former director of the School of Information Sciences in the College of Communication and Information, passed away on October 6 at his home in Tucson, Arizona.

All services will be private.

“Ed was a champion of the information sciences profession and dedicated to supporting the next generation of leaders,” said Mike Wirth, dean of the College of Communication and Information. “He played an important role in leading the School of Information Sciences and in guiding its integration into the college. He will be greatly missed.”

In Memoriam: John Quinn

John Quinn, who served as chancellor of UT Knoxville from 1989 to 1992, passed away Monday, October 8. Quinn, a faculty member in the Department of Physics, retired from UT in 2015 after 26 years at the university. He was named chancellor emeritus upon his retirement.

“Dr. Quinn was a renowned physicist and dedicated campus leader,” said Interim Chancellor Wayne Davis.” His love for the University of Tennessee and his legacy as a researcher and educator makes us proud to call him part of the Volunteer family. On behalf of the university, I want to express our heartfelt condolences to his family.”

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Developed Countries Need to Invest in Green Energies to Reach Climate Goals

A family in Tarialan, Uvs Province, Mongolia, uses a solar panel to generate power for their ger, a traditional Mongolian tent. United Nations Photo

A family in Tarialan, Uvs Province, Mongolia, uses a solar panel to generate power for their ger, a traditional Mongolian tent. United Nations Photo

Developed countries will need to invest more resources in green energies and less in fossil fuels in order to meet the goals set by the Paris Agreement, according to a study published earlier this year in Nature Energy.

The research was led by David McCollum, 2016 Baker Research Fellow in Energy and Environment in UT’s Howard H. Baker Jr. Center for Public Policy.

The study compared six model-based scenarios, each attempting to map the required investments needed to fulfill the world’s current climate goals. Although the results of each varied slightly, there is a stark trend that appears throughout: fossil fuel investments must decrease in favor of green energy, and the amount of money invested in green technology must increase substantially.

The research is centered primarily around article 2.1 of the Paris Agreement, which aims to hold the increase of the global average temperature to well below 2°C. The same article also calls for strengthening the international response to limit the global temperature from surpassing 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels, an even more difficult goal to accomplish.

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UT Hosts Conference Addressing Community Engagement

Recently named interim president Randy Boyd and former member of the Tennessee House of Representatives Gloria Johnson at the Building University-Community Relationships: More Than One And Done conference at the Howard H. Baker Jr. Center for Public Policy.

Recently named interim president Randy Boyd attends the Building University-Community Relationships: More Than One And Done conference at the Howard H. Baker Jr. Center for Public Policy on October 8, 2018.

UT hosted a two-day engagement and outreach conference October 8 and 9, bringing together more than 150 faculty, staff, and community partners to discuss collaborations between higher education institutions and their larger communities.

The Office of Community Engagement and Outreach, Office of Research and Engagement, the Office of Diversity and Community Relations in the Haslam College of Business, and University-Assisted Community Schools in the College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences partnered to host the conference, Building University-Community Relationships: More Than One and Done.

The conference was meant to foster collaboration between UT and its community partners, with speakers highlighting potential issues institutions face when engaging communities and sharing successful examples of national solutions and partnerships. Representatives of UT’s 11 academic colleges were in attendance as well as a variety of community partners including United Way of Greater Knoxville, Centro Hispano de East Tennessee, the Boys and Girls Club, Big Brothers Big Sisters of East Tennessee, and the YMCA.

“We have a lot of scholars on campus who incorporate community engagement into their research and scholarly efforts, which is why it is important to have a mechanism for them to discuss these types of projects,” said Javiette Samuel, UT’s director of community engagement and outreach. “It also helps to ensure that we are implementing best practices when working with our community partners. The goal is to create a dialogue wherein new ideas are spurred, and we wanted to build that opportunity into this conference.”

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Grant Funds Digitization of Vintage Agricultural Publications

This 1940 circular from the Agriculture Extension Service includes designs for home gardens, gates, and fences.

The University of Tennessee Libraries has secured funding from Project Ceres to digitize and preserve a selection of vintage agricultural publications from UT Extension and UT Experiment Stations (now named UT AgResearch). A digital collection of the Tennessee Farm News (1922-1988), Tennessee Farm and Home Science (1952-1988), and a series of Extension special circulars (1925-1968) will be available online next year at digital.lib.utk.edu.

These early agricultural publications from the UT Institute of Agriculture are used regularly for research on historical crop yields, markets, farm tips, and Tennessee agricultural programs. UT preserved the Extension publications in the university archives and is the only library known to hold copies [according to a search of WorldCat, the world’s largest bibliographic database].

Continue reading at the UT Libraries website.

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