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UTHSC


One Health is a concept that recognizes that humans, animals, plants, and the environment are inextricably linked—the health of one affects the health of all—and health issues must be addressed cohesively.

The UT System plans to do just that by harnessing the statewide resources from UT Knoxville, UT Institute of Agriculture, UT Health Science Center, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory to make life-changing contributions to the global One Health effort.

Read more at news.utk.edu.


The Occupational Therapy Department at UTHSC will award a posthumous degree to Rachel Kay Stevens, who died in 2015. In life, Rachel wanted to help children as an occupational therapist. After her death, her teachers and classmates are ensuring her wish is fulfilled with the establishment of the Rachel Kay Stevens Therapy Center. The awarding of a posthumous degree is a rare occurrence.

Three students have been awarded scholarships to travel abroad to study critical languages that are imperative to the United States’ future security and stability. Katie Plank, a May graduate in ecology and evolutionary biology, will be studying Chinese in Dalian, China. John “Harrison” Akins, a PhD student in the Department of Political Science focusing on international relations, comparative politics, and public policy, will be studying Urdu in Lucknow, India. Jonathan Hubbard-Shaw, a senior in linguistics, will be studying Indonesian in Malang, Indonesia.

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Mark Dean, a professor in the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, College of Engineering and an icon in the world of personal computing, has added another title to his already prestigious career: National Academy of Inventors Fellow for 2014.

Dean, the Fisher Distinguished Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, holds three of IBM’s original nine patents for personal computers, including for the technology that allows multiple devices to be plugged into a computer at the same time.

“To have been selected for this and to see some of the other people on their list makes me feel really good,” said Dean, who joins UT Vice Chancellor for Research and Engagement Taylor Eighmy, a 2013 selection and a professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, as NAI fellows at UT. “There are a lot of great people on there, so being selected is an honor.”

Duane Miller, at the UT Health Science Center in Memphis, was also selected to this year’s class.

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