Skip to content Skip to main navigation Report an accessibility issue

UT Libraries


Project Ceres to digitize and preserve a selection of vintage agricultural publications from UT Extension and UT Experiment Stations (now named UT AgResearch). A digital collection of the Tennessee Farm News (1922-1988), Tennessee Farm and Home Science (1952-1988), and a series of Extension special circulars (1925-1968) will be available online next year at digital.lib.utk.edu.

These early agricultural publications from the UT Institute of Agriculture are used regularly for research on historical crop yields, markets, farm tips, and Tennessee agricultural programs. UT preserved the Extension publications in the university archives and is the only library known to hold copies [according to a search of WorldCat, the world’s largest bibliographic database].

Continue reading at the UT Libraries website.


Observation of Coherent Elastic Neutrino-Nucleus Scattering”) and provide compelling evidence of a concept that has been predicted for more than four decades but never seen.

Efremenko was among the scientists who proposed placing a neutrino facility at SNS, which has clearly already paid dividends. He holds a joint faculty appointment with ORNL and has a long and deep involvement with neutrino physics research, having worked with the KamLANDDoubleChooz and Majorana experiments. Other UT Physics connections to the COHERENT experiment include Jason Newby (PhD, 2003), who is the technical coordinator for the collaboration, which comprises 80 researchers from 19 institutions and four nations. Physics graduate tudent Brandon Becker is also involved with the research.

Interior Architecture’s Liz Teston Named Fulbright ScholarLiz Teston

Liz Teston, an assistant professor and James Johnson Dudley Faculty Scholar in the School of Interior Architecture was named a 2017 Fulbright Scholar.

The Fulbright Program is a prestigious international exchange initiative that awards about 1,100 grants to American scholars each year. Funded by the U.S. government, Fulbright Scholars are chosen based on their leadership and abilities to teach, conduct research and contribute to solutions for shared international concerns.

Teston will spend seven months in Romania as part of the interior architecture faculty at Ion Mincu University of Architecture and Urbanism. There, she will teach a course that focuses on urban spaces, the way people use urban spaces and politics related to design.

Erin Smith to Enter the East Tennessee Writers Hall of FameErin Smith

Erin Elizabeth Smith, senior instructor in English and the Jack E. Reese Writer-in-Residence at UT Libraries, will be inducted into the East Tennessee Writers Hall of Fame at 11:30 a.m. Thursday, October 19.

Smith teaches poetry writing, public writing, and literature and genre classes including Women in American Literature and Introduction to Poetry. She is the author of two full-length poetry collections, The Naming of Strays and The Fear of Being Found, which were re-released last year. Her poetry and nonfiction have appeared in 32 PoemsMid-AmericanThe Yalobusha ReviewNew Delta ReviewFlorida ReviewThird CoastCrab OrchardWest Branch, and Willow Springs.

As writer-in-residence, she organizes the Writers in the Library series, which brings local, regional, and nationally known authors to Hodges Library to share their works with the campus community.


The Society for History in the Federal Government awarded its Thomas Jefferson Prize to The Papers of Andrew Jackson: Volume X, 1832, a project that has obtained photocopies of every known and available Jackson document, at a ceremony at the National Archives in Washington earlier this month. Volume X of the Jackson Papers was edited by UT Department of History faculty members Daniel Feller, Thomas Coens, and Laura-Eve Moss.

Continue reading


is one of the newest members of NASA’s Curiosity Mars Rover mission.

Ashley Maynor, digital humanities librarian, has been named a “mover and shaker” in the library field by the national publication Library Journal.

Stephen Blackwell, a UT professor of Russian in the Department of Modern Foreign Languages and Literatures, has been getting a lot of attention for his book Fine Lines: Vladimir Nabokov’s Scientific Art — the first full appraisal of Vladimir Nabokov’s contributions as a scientist. Reviews have recently appeared in the New Yorker, Nature, and the Washington Post.