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The Kosciuszko Foundation selected Jan Rosinski, professor in the Department of Mathematics, as an Eminent Scientist of Polish Origin and Ancestry in 2018. Fewer than 400 scientists, 21 of whom are mathematicians, have received this prestigious honor.

“Naturally, I was very proud and honored to be included in this list,” Rosinski says. “Together with a letter and diploma, I received an invitation to the annual dinner and ball in New York City, celebrating Poland’s 100th Anniversary of Independence. My wife Wanda and I attended and met many accomplished and interesting people of Polish descent living in various parts of the United States and associated with the Foundation.”

Founded in 1925, on the eve of the 150th anniversary of Thaddeus Kosciuszko’s enlistment in the American revolutionary cause, the Kosciuszko Foundation is a national not-for-profit, nonpartisan, and nonsectarian organization. The Foundation promotes closer ties between Poland and the United States through educational, scientific, and cultural exchanges. It awards up to $1 million annually in fellowships and grants to graduate students, scholars, scientists, professionals, and artists, and promotes Polish culture in America.

Record Number of Students Earn Gilman Scholarships to Travel Abroad

A record-setting 17 UT students received Gilman Scholarships during the 2017–18 academic year.

The Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship Program supports American undergraduate students of limited financial means in studying or interning abroad. Since 2001, it has enabled more than 25,000 students to engage in educational experiences around the world.

Gilman Scholars receive up to $5,000 to apply toward international study or internship program costs with additional funding available for the study of a crucial language overseas.

“This scholarship is very important, especially at UT, given how many of our students are Pell-grant eligible,” said Karen Richters, Gilman advisor at UT.

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has been invited to serve on the board of directors for the Council on Food, Agricultural and Resource Economics, also known as C-FARE. The council provides information and expertise to decision makers in Washington and functions as a catalyst for incorporating economic principles into the analysis of agricultural and resource decisions.
C-FARE matches expertise to public needs, serving as a conduit between academic research, extension and national policy makers. Muhammad’s considerable experience includes leadership positions at USDA’s Economic Research Service, where he developed an extensive network of trade policy experts and forged solid working relationships with decision makers in the public and private sectors. His research on global food demand has been widely cited and used in economic and global models used by USDA (the baseline GTAP model) and by the International Food Policy Research Institute (the IMPACT model).
Muhammad’s current research focuses on agricultural trade and trade policy, effects of trade on developing countries, and global food demand.

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Kristina Kravchenko is graduating with her bachelor’s degree at 17 years old. Records indicate she’s one of the youngest UT graduates ever, and is one of the two top graduates of the College of Animal Science and Natural Resources at UT.

Tom Winston is a 73 year old UT graduate who completed his law degree last week. He has “tried to retire at 59, 61, and 63 and failed miserably each time,” and decided to go to law school because he was “bored with retirement.”

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