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religious studies


Hackett Receives Honorary Chieftaincy in Nigeria

Rosalind I. J. Hackett, a Distinguished Professor in the Humanities and professor of religious studies in the College of Arts and Sciences, is starting the school year with two new titles.

In August, Hackett received an honorary chieftaincy in Nigeria, an honor that only more recently has been accorded to foreigners, especially women. During the chieftaincy ceremony, she was told the honor would come with blessings. Days after the event, she was named a University of Tennessee Chancellor’s Professor.

“The timing was very meaningful to me,” said Hackett. “It comes at a time in my career when I was taking stock of all the research, teaching, mentoring, and conference planning I have conducted in Africa and beyond over the years. It’s a delight to get this recognition.”

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The Papers of Andrew Jackson project received $325,000 to prepare Volumes 11, 12, and 13 for publication, covering the presidential years 1833 through 1835. This grant is the second highest among the 21 awarded this year within the NEH Scholarly Editions and Translations program.

“This generous grant is the largest we have ever received from the NEH and comes as a welcome show of confidence in the quality and significance of our work,” says Dan Feller, professor of history and director of The Papers of Andrew Jackson project. “Together with the substantial increase in support we received this year from the National Historical Publications and Records Commission, this three-year NEH award ensures that our progress towards completion of the series will continue and even accelerate.”

Architecture Professor Chosen as Design Research Fellow

Marshall Prado, assistant professor in the School of Architecture, has been selected as a 2018-2019 Exhibit Columbus University Design Research fellow.

Exhibit Columbus in Columbus, Indiana, is an annual exploration of architecture, art, design and community that offers an international symposium and exhibition.  Since 2015, the event has drawn visitors from around the world.

As part of the fellowship, Prado will participate in the 2018 Exhibit Columbus Symposium.  He will join other fellows to present a conversation on States of Design Education and introspections of their innovative research.  Prado’s research centers on robotic fabrication of fiber composite structures in architecture and the integration of computation and fabrication techniques into material systems and spatial design strategies. Companies that support his research include Oak Ridge National Laboratory Carbon Fiber Technology Facility, Owens Corning and Hexion Inc.

Prado is one of nine fellows from eight universities. The Exhibit Columbus committee received 32 proposals from 10 universities.

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erin.chapin@utk.edu).

  • Thereasa Abrams, assistant professor in the College of Social Work, has developed an app called the Bridge to help burn victims heal faster. She also founded a multidisciplinary team to enhance the app to serve the unique needs of burn survivors nationally and internationally.

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ernst150Kathleen “Kassie” Ernst, a doctoral student in energy geography at the Bredesen Center for Interdisciplinary Research and Graduate Education, will be going to Norrköping, Sweden, to study climate related issues. Ernst, who is from Whitehall, Wisconsin, will be working with the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute and the Stockholm Environment Institute to find ways of making climate information gleaned from models more usable for urban policy makers.

rewcastle150Kenna Rewcastle, a 2015 graduate in the College Scholars program, will be going to Sweden to complete research on the impact of climate change on the food source for reindeer herds managed by the Sami indigenous people. Rewcastle, of Apison, Tennessee, who was also a Haslam Scholar as an undergraduate, spent the last year researching climate change as a laboratory and field technician with UT’s Classen Ecosystem Ecology Lab, which was helping with a project funded by the Department of Energy. She also has worked in labs in Denmark, China, Sweden, and Switzerland.
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