Skip to content Skip to main navigation Report an accessibility issue

publication


Responsible Conduct of Research Lunch and Learn series. The series boasts a comprehensive program of topic areas intended to educate our campus community about the importance of ethical research practices and relevant compliance topics.

This session reviewed professional norms and ethical practices pertaining to the publication and dissemination of scientific research. Common misconceptions and best practices specific to each stage of the publication process were discussed.

For example, Caldwell explained the difference between authorship and acknowledgement. Authorship credit should be limited to those individuals who provided significant intellectual contributions to the work, including making substantial contributions to the study’s concept and design, drafting and/or critically revising the content, approving the manuscript for publication, and agreeing to be accountable for all aspects of the manuscript. Individuals whose contributions were helpful but fall short of the criterion for authorship should still be acknowledged. Journals often require a section at the end of a manuscript detailing the specific contributions of each author to ensure appropriate designations.
Continue reading


is one of the newest members of NASA’s Curiosity Mars Rover mission.

Ashley Maynor, digital humanities librarian, has been named a “mover and shaker” in the library field by the national publication Library Journal.

Stephen Blackwell, a UT professor of Russian in the Department of Modern Foreign Languages and Literatures, has been getting a lot of attention for his book Fine Lines: Vladimir Nabokov’s Scientific Art — the first full appraisal of Vladimir Nabokov’s contributions as a scientist. Reviews have recently appeared in the New Yorker, Nature, and the Washington Post.