Skip to content Skip to main navigation Report an accessibility issue

NIMBioS

received a top award from the Southeastern Conference.

Louis Gross was honored with the 2018 SEC Faculty Achievement Award, the SEC announced today. He is an Alvin and Sally Beaman Distinguished Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and Mathematics. He also is director of the UT Institute for Environmental Modeling and of the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS), based at UT.

The award recognizes professors from the 14 SEC schools who have outstanding records in teaching and scholarship. Honorees from each university receive a $5,000 honorarium and become their university’s nominee for SEC Professor of the Year, to be awarded this spring. The Professor of the Year recipient will receive an additional $15,000 honorarium and be recognized at an SEC awards dinner in Destin, Florida.

McClung Museum Wins Award from Museum Association

The McClung Museum of Natural History and Culture received a Tennessee Association of Museums (TAM) Award of Excellence for the museum’s special exhibition Fish Forks and Fine Furnishings: Consumer Culture in the Gilded Age, which ran from May 26 to August 27, 2017.

The exhibition examined how Gilded Age (1870–1900) consumer goods––from fish forks to fashionable dress, furniture, and china––were visible and powerful symbols of wealth, power, and social class. It was curated by the museum’s Assistant Director and Curator Catherine Shteynberg and featured more than 100 objects from the museum’s permanent collections as well as items from other museums and private lenders. Fish Forks and Fine Furnishings is one of the museum’s most visited special exhibits in recent history; it incorporated a variety of public programming, including lectures, free family fun days and stroller tours, summer camps, and a cocktail party fundraiser.

Continue reading

Dr. Elias Fernandez, Associate Professor in the Department of Biochemistry & Cellular and Molecular Biology, has been awarded a new R15 award from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences for his project, “The Role of Allostery in CAR Transactivation.” NIH has established the R15 Award to stimulate research at educational institutions that provide baccalaureate training for a significant number of the nation’s research scientists but that have not been major recipients of NIH support. The award provides funding for small-scale, new or ongoing health-related research projects.

Gross Named NIMBioS Director, Chosen as Fellow

Louis J. Gross has been named the new NIMBioS director. A distinguished UT professor of ecology and evolutionary biology and mathematics, Gross is the founding director of the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS) and director of UT’s Institute for Environmental Modeling. He has also been chosen as a member of the inaugural class of fellows of the Society for Mathematical Biology. His research focuses on computational and mathematical ecology, with applications to plant ecology, conservation biology, natural resource management, and landscape ecology.

Alderman to Study Role of Geography, Geospatial Intelligence During Civil Rights Era

Derek Alderman, a UT professor of geography, has received a three-year $373,000 National Science Foundation grant to explore those geospatial tactics and determine what can be learned about patterns of racial inequality. Alderman will also examine how groups like the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) collected and leveraged geospatial intelligence data to bolster their activist efforts. The findings will be crucial to advancing modern knowledge of geospatial intelligence, particularly since many of the issues of the civil rights era are still relevant today. It also would help define how we view African American resistance and geography in general, Alderman said.

Student, Faculty Design/Build Project Recognized with Statewide Award of Excellence

The multi-awarded Beardsley Farm Education Center has earned statewide recognition from the Tennessee American Institute of Architects. The project, a product of the college’s successful design/build program, received the Design Award of Excellence, the organization’s highest honor, during its state convention in Memphis this month.Led by professors Jennifer Akerman and Bob French, students and faculty designed and largely built the 1,200-square-foot center at CAC Beardsley Community Farm, an urban farm that serves those in need in Knoxville. The structure used more than 30,000 bricks donated by General Shale to provide a classroom, office spaces and restrooms for the farm. Students also designed and built an amphitheater for the outdoor classroom.


Please send faculty, staff and student recognitions to Erin Chapin (erin.chapin@utk.edu).

erin.chapin@utk.edu).

  • The Smart Communities Initiative was honored by the Southeast Tennessee Development District, a past and continuing partner, with their Flame Award, an overall agency award recognizing the SCI program and the university for commitment to engage the community, solve real-world problems, and “ignite the imagination of future leaders”.

Continue reading

Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and School of Art have partnered with the Great Smoky Mountains National Park Inventory and Monitoring Branch to create a new web application, Species Mapper.

Everyone from park managers to school groups can use Species Mapper to explore suitable habitats for more than 1,800 species.
Continue reading