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Wang Fei (2017), Governor’s Chair for Power Electronics Yilu Liu (2016), J. Douglas Birdwell (2015), professor emeritus of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, John Fisher Distinguished Professor Mark Dean (2014), and former Vice Chancellor for Research and Engagement Taylor Eighmy (2013).

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National Academy of Inventors.

Yilu Liu, the UT-Oak Ridge National Laboratory Governor’s Chair for Power Electronics, serves as deputy director of the National Science Foundation-backed Center for Ultra-wide-area Resilient Electric Energy Transmission Networks—CURENT—which is housed in UT’s Tickle College of Engineering.

Through her role with CURENT, as a researcher, and as a professor of electrical engineering and computer science at UT, Liu has helped pioneer many of the advancements in the safeguarding of the nation’s power grid.
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Yilu Liu, the joint UT–Oak Ridge National Laboratory Governor’s Chair for Electric Power Grids, has been named a newly elected member of the National Academy of Engineering.

Suzanne Waddill-Goad, assistant professor for the College of Nursing recently published a book titled Nurse Burnout: Overcoming Stress in Nursing. Advanced Healthcare Network for Nurses shared Waddill-Goad’s news on their website.

Kenneth D. Kihm, Magnavox Professor in the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Biomedical Engineering, has published in Nature Communications on “High-Efficiency Electrochemical Thermal Energy Harvester Using Carbon Nanotube Aerogel Sheet Electrodes.”


National Academy of Inventors.

Doug BirdwellBirdwell, a professor emeritus of electrical engineering and computer science, is the third person from UT to be so honored. Previously named fellows include Vice Chancellor for Research and Engagement Taylor Eighmy and John Fisher Distinguished Professor Mark Dean.

Birdwell’s research into computing and information systems has spanned from their initial surge in the 1970s through their universal adoption today.

Birdwell said he suspects the award comes for his work on high-performance databases.

 “Those resources are for data derived from DNA and their utility in human identification, both using direct search and search via family relationships,” he said.

Continue reading at tntoday.utk.edu.