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Joint Institute for Nuclear Physics and Applications

Robert Grzywacz stands at the neutron detector array he and a UT team built at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva, Switzerland.

Robert Grzywacz stands at the neutron detector array he and a UT team built at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva, Switzerland.

Robert Grzywacz, along with collaborators at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, developed the software used in the equipment that detects the new elements and helps analyze data from the experiments. He is a co-author of recent papers, representing a collaboration between US and Russian scientists, that present new data on elements 113, 115, 117, and 118.

The International Union for Pure and Applied Chemistry recently announced formal verification of the four new chemical elements and recognized ORNL for the discovery of two: 115, temporarily named ununpentium (Uup, element 115), and 117, temporarily named ununseptium (Uus, element 117).

The four new elements complete the seventh row of the periodic table.

Continue reading at tntoday.utk.edu.