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Students’ Research to Potentially Become Cherokee Biographies for Children

A group of UT students spent this fall delving into the lives of Cherokees who called East Tennessee home in the 1800s, before they were forcibly removed and relocated west of the Mississippi River.

Julie Reed holds a children’s biography of Wilma Mankiller, the first female chief of the Cherokee Nation.

Julie Reed holds a children’s biography of Wilma Mankiller, the first female chief of the Cherokee Nation.

The students’ research and recovery of the lost stories of every day Cherokees could be translated into the Cherokee language and become children’s books that would find their way to immersion schools, cultural centers, and local museums.

“It helps us understand that history is not just a jumble of dates but an explanation of how we all came to be the way we are now,” said Katie Myers, a College Scholar and UT junior.

She added that the biographies will help children relate better to history, noting that

“It’s really important for people to know their own story and know the stories of people who are just like them.”

Continue reading at tntoday.utk.edu.

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