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Recognitions, July 8

  • Wayne Davis, dean of the College of Engineering, has been elected as a fellow of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE)—one of the highest honors an engineering educator can receive—in recognition of his contributions as a researcher, teacher, and leader.

  • Researchers at the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS) recently published their research using mathematical modeling to examine granuloma formation in Johne’s disease (a fatal gastrointestinal disease found in animals). Their project was published in Frontiers in MicrobiologyThe study was co-authored by Vitaly Ganusov (assistant professor of microbiology), Shigetoshi Eda (professor of forestry, wildlife and fisheries), and three NIMBioS 2014 Summer Research Experiences (SRE) students: Margaret McDaniel (University of Tennessee), Nitin Krishna (University of Chicago), and Winode Handagama (Maryville College).
  • Claire Stigliani, assistant professor of drawing and painting in the School of Art, recently received a $25,000 grant through the Joan Mitchell Foundation’s Painters and Sculptors Grant Program. She is also in the midst of her first solo museum exhibition.
  • Victoria Niederhauser, dean of the College of Nursing, has been appointed to serve on the National Advisory Council for Accelerating Interprofessional Community-Based Education and Practice.
  • The University of Tennessee has been selected to participate in the White House’s latest National Network for Manufacturing Innovation: the Smart Manufacturing Innovation Institute.
  • Joe Jarret, a lecturer in the Department of Political Science, has won two national awards for his contributions to the field of risk management. The Public Risk Management Association awarded him the Public Risk Magazine Article of the Year for his article Overzealous Zoning: Challenges for the Public Risk Manager and also named him the Public Risk Author of the Year.
  • The 2017 edition of the Fiske Guide to Colleges has named the University of Tennessee one of the “best and most interesting” schools in the United States, Canada, and Britain.
  • The Impact Internship program is a small scholarship program offered through UT’s Center for Career Development providing funding to help students make financial ends meet while working in an unpaid or low-stipend internship that provides valuable professional experience. Four students were named as recipients for this year:
    • Lucy Greer (junior, political science)
    • Chelsea Belcher (senior, environmental soil science)
    • Courtney McCall (master’s student, business analytics)
    • Austin Merical (senior, wildlife and fisheries management)

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