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Funding Opportunities Roundup: August 7

Advancing Informal STEM Learning (AISL) NSF 15-593

This program seeks to advance new approaches to and evidence-based understanding of the design and development of STEM learning opportunities for the public in informal environments; provide multiple pathways for broadening access to and engagement in STEM learning experiences; and advance innovative research on and assessment of STEM learning in informal environments. The AISL program supports seven types of projects: (1) Collaborative Planning, (2) Exploratory Pathways, (3) Research in Service to Practice, (4) Innovations in Development, (5) Broad Implementation, (6) Conferences, and (7) Informal STEM Learning Resource Center (FY 2016 only).

Anticipated Type of Award: Standard Grant or Continuing Grant or Cooperative Agreement

Estimated Number of Awards: Pending availability of funds, it is anticipated that about 10-12 Collaborative Planning awards, 10-12 Exploratory Pathways awards, 6-8 Research in Service To Practice awards, 8-10 Innovations in Development awards, 3-6 Broad Implementation awards, and 5-7 Conference awards will be made. AISL will also fund 5-7 awards made through the EAGER and RAPID mechanisms and 2-4 CAREER awards. Up to one (1) Informal STEM Learning Resource Center award is anticipated in FY 2016.

Anticipated Funding Amount: Pending availability of funds, it is anticipated that about 10-12 Collaborative Planning awards, 10-12 Exploratory Pathways awards, 6-8 Research in Service To Practice awards, 8-10 Innovations in Development awards, 3-6 Broad Implementation awards, and 5-7 Conference awards will be made. AISL will also fund 5-7 awards made through the EAGER and RAPID mechanisms and 2-4 CAREER awards. Up to one (1) Informal STEM Learning Resource Center award is anticipated in FY 2016.

Limits for funding requests of AISL proposals are as follows:

  1. Collaborative Planning projects: up to $150,000 with duration of one year
  2. Exploratory Pathways projects: up to $300,000 with duration up to two years
  3. Research in Service to Practice projects: from $300,000 to $2,000,000 with a duration from two to five years
  4. Innovations in Development projects: $500,000 to $3,000,000 with duration from two to five years
  5. Broad Implementation projects from $500,000 to $3,000,000 with a duration from two to five years
  6. Conference projects up to $250,000 with a duration of up to two years
  7. Up to one Informal STEM Learning Resource Center award up to $5 million with a duration of five years

If the Resource Center is funded in 2016, there will not be a competition for a Resource Center in 2017.

See full RFP for details.

DEADLINE: November 4, 2015


AFRL: Improved Networking Through Embedded Processing and Sensing

The Air Force Research Lab (AFRL) recently published a solicitation entitled Improved Networking Through Embedded Processing and Sensing that seeks to “develop, demonstrate, and evaluate new sources and methods for improving network connectivity and stability through embedded processing and sensing.”  Research under this program is expected to produce “system network enhancements that provide the flexibility required to adapt to and operate in contested, congested, or intermittent environments.”  AFRL is particularly interested in the “focus areas” below, but projects are not limited to these areas.

  1. Network Sensing Technologies
    1. Develop methods, models, and rigorous semantics for interoperability and integration across heterogeneous systems.
    2. Develop methods for sensing and data processing to allow both wired and wireless networks to self-organize into a distributed network topology.
    3. Demonstrate, test, and measure improved performance of the designed interconnected sensors, actuators, and component networks.
  2. Network Embedded Processing
    1. Develop information management capabilities at multiple OSI (Open System Interconnection) layers to support the integration of different protocols used in identified networks
    2. Develop models and algorithms that optimize in-network processing in terms of computation and communication, and analyze resource usage for the purpose of extending the lifetime of network processors.
    3. Demonstrate, test, and evaluate the hardware and software performance of the proposed architecture.
  3. Distributed Control
    1. Integrate and test cyber warfare and knowledge management technologies and techniques. This includes producing mission needs analyses and risk and vulnerability assessments.
    2. Enable transition of data-sharing and collaboration frameworks across the government to achieve greater levels of situational awareness, and enable more accurate and timely decision-making.
    3. Develop systems management technologies to enable strategic operational, tactical level C2 of current and future architectures, ensuring connectivity and maximizing effectiveness of operations in a contested environment.
    4. Develop network architectures designed for continuous operations in the face of uncertain C2 capabilities. Include real-time adaptability mechanisms for planning strike, Intelligence, Surveillance, Recognizance (ISR) and Electronic Warfare (EW) missions.

AFRL anticipates awards will be $1-3M annually for up to 3 years.  

See full RFP for details.

DEADLINE: A 3-5 page white paper is due by October 30 to be considered for funding in FY 16.


AFRL: Next Generation Intelligence Collection and Analyses

The Air Force Research Lab (AFRL) recently published this solicitation entitled Next Generation Intelligence Collection and Analyses that seeks to “develop, demonstrate, and evaluate new sources and methods for collecting and analyzing intelligence data.”  Research under this program is expected to provide “algorithms, architectures, and system frameworks flexible enough to interoperate with any ISR (Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance) assets necessary.  This includes fusion of multiple sensors and the management of the large quantities of data generated by modern sensors (commonly referred to as “big data”).”  AFRL is particularly interested in the “focus areas” below, but projects are not limited to these areas. 

  1. Sensor Fusion for Intelligence
    1. Develop methods and models for rapidly processing data from multiple sources while maintaining data integrity.
    2. Design, produce, and demonstrate software that will manipulate information from multiple sources for display to users in a command and control environment.
    3. Demonstrate, test, and measure performance of the designed interconnected sensors, algorithms, and other system components. 
  2. Data Signature Analysis
    1. Develop Signature Analysis capabilities at multiple mission levels to support the integration of a multitude of common sensor technologies.
    2. Design detailed collection procedures, feature extraction and pre-processing steps, and baseline classifier development for signature analysis. This should include the baseline classification results using the maximum likelihood classifier.
    3. Demonstrate, test, and evaluate the performance of the proposed models and algorithms.
  3. Technologies for Big Data Management
    1. Integrate and test Big Data information management technologies and techniques. This includes producing mission needs analyses and risk and vulnerability assessments.
    2. Develop information management and transmission methods for big data to achieve cross-agency interoperability, collaboration, and shared awareness across DoD and partner agencies. Facilitate interoperability and data discovery to aid in net-centric capabilities across service and agency boundaries.
    3. Enable transition of data-sharing and collaboration frameworks across the government to achieve greater levels of situational awareness, and enable more accurate and timely decision-making.
    4. Investigate methods for sensor data compression, transmission, and delay mitigation. 

AFRL anticipates awards will be $1-3M annually for up to 3 years. 

DEADLINE: A 3-5 page white paper is due by October 30 to be considered for funding in FY 16.


CISE Research Infrastructure (CRI) NSF 15-590

CRI drives discovery and learning in the three core disciplines/CISE divisions: (Division of Computer & Network Systems, Division of Computing & Communication Foundations, and Division of Information & Intelligent Systems). CRI supports the creation and enhancement of world-class research infrastructure to support focused research agendas in computer and information science and engineering. The CRI program supports two classes of awards:

  • Institutional Infrastructure (II) awards support the creation of new (II-NEW) CISE research infrastructure or the enhancement (II-EN) of existing CISE research infrastructure to enable world-class CISE research opportunities at the awardee and collaborating institutions.
  • Community Infrastructure (CI) awards support the planning (CI-P) for new CISE community research infrastructure, the creation of new (CI-NEW) CISE research infrastructure, the enhancement (CI-EN) of existing CISE infrastructure, or the sustainment (CI-SUSTAIN) of existing CISE community infrastructure to enable world-class CISE research opportunities for broad-based communities of CISE researchers that extend well beyond the awardee institutions.

Anticipated Type of Award: Standard Grant or Continuing Grant

Estimated Number of Awards: 25 to 30

Anticipated Funding Amount: NSF expects to fund up to 20 Institutional Infrastructure (II) awards and up to 10 Community Infrastructure (CI) awards in each competition. The majority of the II awards will be made in the $200,000 – $750,000 range, though a small number of II awards may be made in the $750,000 – $1,000,000 range. The majority of the CI awards will be made in the $500,000 – $1,000,000 range, though a very small number of CI awards may be made in the $1,000,000 – $2,500,000 range. The majority of the Community Infrastructure Planning (CI-P) awards will be made in the $50,000 – $100,000 range.

See full RFP for details.

Preliminary Proposal Deadline (required): November 10, 2015
Full Proposal Deadline: January 20, 2016


Collaborative Research in Computational Neuroscience (CRCNS) NSF 15-595
Innovative Approaches to Science and Engineering Research on Brain Function

Computational neuroscience provides a theoretical foundation and a rich set of technical approaches for understanding complex neurobiological systems, building on the theory, methods, and findings of computer science, neuroscience, and numerous other disciplines. Through the CRCNS program, the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research, the French National Research Agency, and the United States-Israel Binational Science Foundation support collaborative activities that will advance the understanding of nervous system structure and function, mechanisms underlying nervous system disorders, and computational strategies used by the nervous system.
Two classes of proposals will be considered in response to this solicitation: Research Proposals describing collaborative research projects, and Data Sharing Proposals to enable sharing of data and other resources. Domestic and international projects will be considered. As detailed in the solicitation, international components of collaborative projects may be funded in parallel by the participating agencies. Opportunities for parallel funding are available for bilateral US-German Research Proposals, US-German Data Sharing Proposals, US-French Research Proposals, US-French Data Sharing Proposals, US-Israel Research Proposals, and multilateral proposals involving the United States and 2 or more additional countries. Appropriate scientific areas of investigations may be related to any of the participating funding organizations. Questions concerning a particular project’s focus, direction and relevance to a participating funding organization should be addressed to the appropriate person in the list of agency contacts found in Section VIII of the solicitation. NSF will coordinate and manage the review of proposals jointly with participating domestic and foreign funding organizations, through a joint panel review process used by all participating funders. Additional information is available in Section VI of the solicitation.

Anticipated Type of Award: Standard Grant or Continuing Grant

Estimated Number of Awards: 15 to 25

Anticipated Funding Amount: Award sizes for Research Projects (both domestic and international) are expected to range from approximately $100,000 to $250,000 per year in direct costs, with durations of three to five years. Most awards will be on the smaller end of this range.

See full RFP for details.

Full Proposal Deadline: October 29, 2015


Discovery Research PreK-12 (DRK-12) NSF 15-592

This program seeks to significantly enhance the learning and teaching of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) by PreK-12 students and teachers, through research and development of STEM education innovations and approaches. Projects build on fundamental research in STEM education and prior research and development efforts that provide theoretical and empirical justification for proposed projects. Projects should result in research-informed and field-tested outcomes and products that inform teaching and learning. Teachers and students who participate in DRK-12 studies are expected to enhance their understanding and use of STEM content, practices and skills. DRK-12 invites proposals that address immediate challenges that are facing preK-12 STEM education as well as those that anticipate radically different structures and functions of preK 12 teaching and learning. The program has three major research and development strands: (1) Assessment; (2) Learning; and (3) Teaching. The program supports five types of projects: (1) Exploratory, (2) Design and Development, (3) Impact, (4) Implementation and Improvement, and (5) Conferences and Syntheses. All five types of projects apply to each of the three DRK-12 strands.

Anticipated Type of Award: Standard Grant or Continuing Grant

Estimated Number of Awards: 35 to 45

Anticipated Funding Amount: Normal limits for funding requests of DRK-12 proposals are as follows: (1) Level I projects up to $450,000 with duration up to three years; (2) Level II projects up to $3,000,000 with duration up to four years; and (3) Level III projects up to $5,000,000 with duration up to five years. The three levels of funding should align with the maturity of the proposed work, the size and scope of the empirical effort, as well as the capacity of the interdisciplinary team to conduct the proposed research.

See full RFP for details.

Full Proposal Deadline: December 7, 2015


DOE: Advanced Reactor Industry Competiton / Development

The Department of Energy has published a Funding Opportunity Announcement that seeks to “foster collaboration with industry and the national laboratories, in support of…advanced reactor concept development projects with the potential to be demonstrated in the 2035 timeframe.” 

DOE anticipates two awards of up to $6M each for FY 15 but up to $50M for the total project over 5 years.  Cost sharing is required.

DOE plans to host a webinar about this FOA on August 24 at 1 p.m (EST). 

See article for details.

DEADLINES:
Letter of Intent: 
August 31
Proposal: October 5


DOE Early Career Funding Opportunity

The Department of Energy recently published its FY 16 Early Career Research Program funding opportunity, which seeks to “support the development of individual research programs of outstanding scientists early in their careers and to stimulate research careers in the areas supported by the DOE Office of Science.”  DOE/OS program areas and topics are listed below, with details contained at the bolded pages in the solicitation.  Once you identify a topic, you should contact the program manager to request feedback on your research idea and confirm that it is a good fit for that particular topic.  In case it is not, you may wish to ask for suggestions of other topics or programs that could be a better match.  

The Early Career program is for single PIs who are untenured assistant or associate professors on a tenure track and who have received a PhD no earlier than 2005.  There is no U.S. citizenship requirement.

Estimated Number of Awards:  20-30 awards, each worth $750K total, for a performance period of 5 years.

DEADLINE: A 2-page pre-application is due by September 10, and a full application, if invited, is due by November 19.  Note that pre-applications must be submitted through the DOE/OS Portfolio Analysis and Management System website; see pp. 50-52 of the solicitation for account registration instructions.  DOE recommends registering no later than September 3 to avoid potential delays in submitting your pre-application.

  • Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) – pp. 3-6
    • Applied Mathematics
    • Computer Science
    • Next Generation Networking for Science
  • Biological and Environmental Research (BER) – pp. 7-10
    • Systems biology-enabled research on the role of microbes and microbial communities in the plant-soil-environment interactions
    • Improved Understanding of Tropical Forest Ecosystems to Climate Change
    • Human Component of Earth System Models 
  • Basic Energy Sciences (BES) – pp. 11-32
    • Materials Chemistry
    • Biomolecular Materials
    • Synthesis and Processing Science
    • Experimental Condensed Matter Physics
    • Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics
    • Physical Behavior of Materials
    • Mechanical Behavior and Radiation Effects
    • X-ray Scattering
    • Neutron Scattering
    • Electron and Scanning Probe Microscopies
    • Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Sciences (AMOS)
    • Gas Phase Chemical Physics (GPCP)
    • Computation and Theoretical Chemistry
    • Condensed Phase and Interfacial Molecular Science (CPIMS)
    • Catalysis Science
    • Separations and Analysis
    • Heavy Element Chemistry (HEC)
    • Geosciences Research
    • Solar Photochemistry
    • Photosynthetic Systems
    • Physical Biosciences
    • Nanoscale Science Research Centers and Electron-Beam Microcharacterization Centers Research
    • Accelerator and Detector Research
    • X-ray Instrumentation and Technique Development
    • Neutron Scattering Instrumentation and Technique Development 
  • Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) – pp. 32-35
    • Magnetic Fusion Energy Science Experimental Research
    • Magnetic Fusion Energy Science Theory and Simulation
    • High-Energy-Density Plasma Science
    • General Plasma Science Experiment and Theory
    • Fusion Nuclear Science, Materials Research and Enabling R&D Programs for Fusion 
  • High Energy Physics (HEP) – pp. 36-39
    • Experimental Research at the Energy Frontier in High Energy Physics
    • Experimental Research at the Intensity Frontier in High Energy Physics
    • Experimental Research at the Cosmic Frontier in High Energy Physics
    • Theoretical Research in High Energy Physics
    • Accelerator Science and Technology Research & Development in High Energy Physics
    • Detector Research and Development in High Energy Physics
  • Nuclear Physics (NP) – pp. 39-43
    • Medium Energy Nuclear Physics
    • Heavy Ion Nuclear Physics
    • Low Energy Nuclear Physics
    • Nuclear Theory
    • Nuclear Data and Nuclear Theory Computing
    • Accelerator Research and Development for Current and Future Nuclear Physics Facilities
    • Isotope Development and Production for Research and Applications

Gen-3 Engineering Research Centers (ERC) NSF 15-589

The goal of the ERC program is to integrate engineering research and education with technological innovation to transform national prosperity, health, and security. ERCs create an innovative, inclusive culture in engineering to cultivate new ideas and pursue engineering discovery that achieves a significant science, technology, and societal outcome within the 10-year timeframe of NSF support. For information on individual ERCs and their achievements, go to: http://www.ERC-assoc.org.

Those who submit proposals in response to this solicitation will need to address the following questions:

  1. What is the compelling new idea and how does it relate to national needs?
  2. Why is a center necessary to tackle the idea?
  3. How will the ERC’s infrastructure integrate and implement research, workforce development and innovation ecosystem development efforts to achieve its vision?

Anticipated Type of Award: Cooperative Agreement

Estimated Number of Awards: 4

Anticipated Funding Amount: It is anticipated that the awards would be made in the summer of 2017. The initial award would be for five years, with year one start-up budgets of up to $3,500,000 each. Subsequently, there would be year two budgets of up to $3,750,000, year three budgets of up to $4,000,000 and years four and five budgets of up to $4,250,000 each, pending satisfactory annual performance and availability of funding. Pending performance and the outcome of two renewal reviews in the third and sixth year, support for years six through eight is projected to be up to $4,250,000 in each of those years; and support for year nine and ten would be phased down at a reduced level of 33% of the prior year’s support to prepare the ERC for self-sufficiency from ERC program support at the end of 10 years.

See full RFP for details.

Letter of Intent Deadline (required): September 25, 2014
Preliminary Proposal Deadline (required): October 23, 2015
Full Proposal Deadline: June 16, 2015


Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP) NSF 15-597

The purpose of this program is to help ensure the vitality and diversity of the scientific and engineering workforce of the United States. The program recognizes and supports outstanding graduate students who are pursuing research-based master’s and doctoral degrees in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) and in STEM education. The GRFP provides three years of support for the graduate education of individuals who have demonstrated their potential for significant research achievements in STEM and STEM education. NSF especially encourages women, members of underrepresented minority groups, persons with disabilities, and veterans to apply. NSF also encourages undergraduate seniors to apply. Confirmation of acceptance in a graduate degree program in science or engineering is required at the time of Fellowship acceptance, no later than May 1, 2016. Prospective Fellows must enroll in a university, college, or non-profit academic institution of higher education accredited in, and having a campus located in, the United States, its territories, or possessions, or the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico that offers advanced degrees in STEM or STEM education no later than fall 2016. All Fellows from the date of Acceptance through Completion or Termination of the Fellowship must be affiliated with a graduate degree-granting institution accredited in, and having a campus located in, the United States, its territories, or possessions, or the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico.

Anticipated Type of Award: Fellowship

Estimated Number of Awards: 2,000

Anticipated Funding Amount: Each Fellowship consists of three years of support during a five-year fellowship period. NSF provides a stipend of $34,000 to the Fellow and a cost-of-education allowance of $12,000 to the graduate degree-granting institution for each Fellow who uses the fellowship support in a fellowship year.

See full RFP for details.

Full Proposal Deadline:
October 26, 2015 – Geosciences; Life Sciences
October 27, 2015 – Computer and Information Science and Engineering; Engineering; Materials Research
October 29, 2015 – Psychology; Social Sciences; STEM Education and Learning
October 30, 2015 – Chemistry; Mathematical Sciences; Physics and Astronomy


Ideas Lab: Measuring “Big G” Challenge NSF 15-591

The gravitational constant, G, describes the strength of gravitation, the weakest of the four fundamental interactions in nature. Although several hundred measurements of this constant have been performed over the last two and a quarter centuries, recent experiments differ by as much as 0.05%, about 40 times the uncertainty of the most precise experiment.

Motivations to resolve the current discrepancy with better measurements are two-fold. First, the search for a theory that unifies gravitation with quantum electrodynamics is an active area of research. Such a theory may be able to predict the value of G, and an experimental result may become important to test such theories. Second, understanding the subtleties involved in precisely and absolutely measuring a small force is important for many fields of physics and metrology, including the Casimir effect, spring constants of atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever, intermolecular forces in DNA.

This solicitation describes an Ideas Lab on “Measuring Big G.” Ideas Labs are intensive meetings focused on finding innovative solutions to grand challenge problems. The ultimate aim of this Ideas Lab organized by the Physics Division of the Mathematical and Physical Sciences Directorate at the National Science Foundation (NSF), in collaboration with experts in the field, is to facilitate the development of new experiments designed to measure Newton’s gravitational constant G with relative uncertainties approaching or surpassing one part in 100,000. The aspiration is that mixing researchers from diverse scientific backgrounds will engender fresh thinking and innovative approaches that will provide a fertile ground for new ideas on how to measure G that can be used to validate and extend current calculations.US researchers may submit preliminary proposals for participation in the Ideas Lab only via FastLane. The goal is to develop multidisciplinary ideas that eventually will be submitted as full proposals.

Anticipated Type of Award: Standard Grant or Continuing Grant

Estimated Number of Awards: 1 to 5

Anticipated Funding Amount: Up to $2,000,000 will be available for US researchers in 2016-2017 for successful proposals through the Ideas Lab, pending availability of funds and compelling proposals.

See full RFP for details.

Preliminary Proposal Deadline: Sept. 21, 2015
Full Proposal Deadline: January 14, 2016


Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST) NSF 15-599

This program promotes PreK-12 student interests and capacities to participate in the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) and information and communications technology (ICT) workforce of the future. To achieve this objective, ITEST supports the development, implementation, and selective spread of innovative strategies for engaging students in experiences that: (1) increase student awareness of STEM and ICT careers; (2) motivate students to pursue the education necessary to participate in those careers; and/or (3) provide students with technology-rich experiences that develop their knowledge of related content and skills (including critical thinking skills) needed for entering the STEM workforce. ITEST projects must involve students, and may also include teachers. The program is especially interested in broadening participation of students from traditionally underrepresented groups in STEM fields and related education and workforce domains. Projects that actively engage business and industry partners to better ensure that PreK-12 experiences foster the knowledge and skill-sets needed for emerging STEM-related occupations are strongly encouraged. ITEST supports two project types: Strategies projects and SPrEaD (Successful Project Expansion and Dissemination) projects. All ITEST projects may include activities designed to inform judgments regarding the feasibility of implementing strategies in typical learning environments associated with formal classrooms, out-of-school settings, or combinations of such environments. The ITEST program also invites proposals for an ITEST Resource Center to provide technical assistance to projects and provide assistance with the outreach activities of the ITEST program.

Anticipated Type of Award: Standard Grant or Continuing Grant

Estimated Number of Awards: 20 to 30

Anticipated Funding Amount: Approximately 15-20 Strategies awards with durations up to three years and total budgets up to $1,200,000 each will be made, depending on availability of funds; and approximately 5-10 SPrEaD awards with durations of three to five years and total budgets up to $2,000,000 each will be made. One Resource Center with a budget of up to $3,500,000 will be supported for a duration of three years.

See full RFP for details.

Full Proposal Deadline: November 13, 2015


NASA: Human Exploration Research Opportunities (HERO)

This National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Research Announcement (NRA), entitled Human Exploration Research Opportunities (HERO)–2015, solicits applied research in support of NASA’s Human Research Program (HRP). The HRP contains six Elements: Space Radiation, Human Health Countermeasures, Exploration Medical Capability, Behavioral Health and Performance, Space Human Factors and Habitability, and International Space Station Medical Project. Fourteen disciplines or areas support the Program: the Behavioral Health and Performance, Bone, Cardiovascular, Extravehicular Activity, Immunology, Medical Capabilities, Muscle, Nutrition, Pharmacology, Radiation, Sensorimotor, Advanced Food Technology, Advanced Environmental Health, and Space Human Factors Engineering Disciplines.

HERO research topics are described in the following four appendices that may be found in the “Program Elements” section here:

  • Appendix A: NASA Research and Technology Development to Support Crew Health and Performance in Space Exploration Missions
    • proposals addressing Behavioral Health and Performance, Human Health Countermeasures, and Space Human Factors and Habitability. Unless otherwise noted, projects are expected to be multiple-year efforts.
  • Appendix B: NSBRI Research and Technology Development to Support Crew Health and Performance in Space Exploration Missions
    • proposals addressing Human Factors and Performance, Musculoskeletal Alterations, Neurobehavioral and Psychosocial Factors, Radiation Effects, and Smart Medical Systems and Technology. Projects are expected to last no more than 1 year.
  • Appendix C: NASA Human Research Program Omnibus Opportunity
    • proposals addressing any risks listed in the Integrated Research Plan (see p. 5 of the solicitation overview). Projects are expected to last no more than 1 year.
  • Appendix D: NASA Human Research Program Artificial Gravity Opportunity
    • proposals addressing Artificial Gravity. Unless otherwise noted, projects are expected to be multiple-year efforts.

Anticipated Type of Award: Standard or continuing grant

Awards generally range from under $100K per year for focused, limited efforts (e.g., data analysis) to $450K per year for extensive activities (e.g., development of scientific hardware) and will be made as grants. The funds available for awards in each research opportunity offered in this NRA range from less than one to several million dollars

See full solicitation for details

DEADLINE: Proposals are due no earlier than September 4, 2015 but refer to the appendices for specific deadlines.  Note that NASA expects to publish a HERO-2016 solicitation next year.


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