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21st Century Cures: Southeast Conference

Photos from the 21st Century Cures: Southeast Conference in March 2017.

Photos from the 21st Century Cures: Southeast Conference in March 2017.

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21st Century Cures: Southeast Conference
March 22, 2018, 8 a.m.–6:30 p.m.
Howard H. Baker Jr. Center for Public Policy
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The University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UT), will host its second 21st Century Cures: Southeast Conference in March 2018 which will focus on using big data to overcome health disparities.

Guests will hear insights from prestigious scientists, learn about research priorities and funding opportunities from leaders at the National Institutes of Health, and meet potential collaborators from across the Southeast. In addition, the event will include an interactive poster session to allow faculty and students to share their ideas with other attendees.

Photos from the 2017 21st Century Cures: Southeast Conference

This year’s conference continues the momentum and enthusiasm from the inaugural event, held in 2017, which focused on the intersection of the Act’s national research priorities with regional strengths in computational approaches, data analytics, basic biology, and materials science. Researchers from fifteen institutions across the Southeast gathered to learn about regional health challenges and form partnerships to address them.

Available Tracks and Speakers for 2018

Opening Keynote Speaker

  • Judith Lee Smith, Senior Behavioral Scientist and Team Lead, Epidemiology and Applied Research Branch, Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Closing Keynote Speaker

  • Nancy Breen, Economist, National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities

Social Determinants of Health (impact on cancer, precision medicine, BRAIN)

This track will focus scientific inquiry related to questions such as: How can big data be used to better quantify and stratify social determinants of health and associated risks? How can big data be used to understand how social determinants effect care received and health outcomes? How can big data be used to discover new patterns or combinations of social determinants? How do the social determinants of health effect and interact with individual genomic variations? How can big data be used to determine when and the type of interventions that will be the most impactful?

  • David Berrigan, Program Director, Health Behaviors Research Branch, National Cancer Institute
  • Stephanie Bohon, Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville
  • Rebecca Clark, Branch Chief, Population Dynamics Branch, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development
  • Ashok Krishnamurthy, Deputy Director of the Renaissance Computing Institute, and Research Professor of Computer Science, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
  • Amy Rose, Team Lead of the Population Distribution and Dynamics in the Geographic Information Science and Technology Group and Theme Lead for the Population and Land Use for the Urban Dynamics Institute, Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Cancer Care and Outcomes

This track will focus scientific inquiry related to questions such as: How can big data be used to improve cancer care and overcome cancer care disparities? How can big data be used to improve cancer outcomes and overcome cancer outcome disparities? How can big data be used to identify “hidden” cancer outcome disparities that may have a biological cause? How can big data be used to anticipate less than desirable cancer care and outcomes? How can big data be used to support clinician decision-making to improve cancer care and outcomes?

  • Nadine Barrett, Director of the Office of Health Equity and Disparities and Assistant Professor in Community and Family Medicine, Duke Cancer Institute
  • Paul Fearn, Branch Chief, Surveillance Research Program, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute
  • Erin Kent, Epidemiologist and Program Director, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute
  • Hunter Moseley, Associate Professor, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, University of Kentucky
  • Chi Wang, Associate Professor, Department of Biostatistics, University of Kentucky
  • Neil Hayes, Scientific Director of the West Institute for Cancer Research and Van Vleet Endowed Professor in Medical Oncology at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center

The 21st Century Cures Act, passed in 2016, allocates $4.8 billion to address some of the most pressing human health challenges of our time. The National Institutes of Health will use this infusion of funding to accelerate research on cancer, the brain, and precision medicine.

View the program book from the 2017 21st Century Cures: Southeast Conference

Please contact Kimberly Eck (865-974-1112, keck@utk.edu), director of Research Development in the Office of Research and Engagement with any questions.

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