Office of Research & Engagement

UT Knoxville


Simpson Named New JIBS Director

Simpson

Simpson

Dr. Michael Simpson, Professor of Materials Sciences and Engineering, Oak Ridge National Laboratory Corporate Fellow, and Group Leader of the Nanofabrication Research Laboratory Group in the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) at ORNL, has been appointed the next director of the UT-ORNL Joint Institute for Biological Sciences (JIBS). This appointment is in addition to his role at CNMS.

Simpson, an expert in stochastic processes in gene expression, nanobiosciences, and synthetic biology, is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, and the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering, and is a member of the JIBS Advisory Board. His appointment begins October 20, 2014. Simpson will follow Dr. Gary Sayler as the second JIBS director. Sayler, Professor of Microbiology and Director of the Center for Environmental Biotechnology, will retire at the end of 2015.

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Distinguished Lecture Series: Securing NIH Funding and Team Science with Dr. Kathleen Dracup

The Office of Research & Engagement and the College of Nursing are pleased to announce a Distinguished Research Lecture Series presented by Dr. Kathleen Dracup, who will present two open lectures on Securing NIH Funding and Team Science. The lectures will be held Friday, November 14, 2014, from 8:30 a.m. – noon in Hodges Library, Room 213.

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Researchers at ORNL Achieve Unmatched Precision in 3-D Manufacturing

ORNL researchers have demonstrated the ability to precisely control the structure and properties of 3-D printed metal parts during formation. The electron backscatter diffraction image shows variations in crystallographic orientation in a nickel-based component, achieved by controlling the 3-D printing process at the microscale. (Photo by ORNL)

The electron backscatter diffraction image shows variations in crystallographic orientation in a nickel-based component, achieved by controlling the 3-D printing process at the microscale.
(Photo by ORNL)

Researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have found a way to control the structure and properties of metal components during an additive manufacturing process with a heretofore unmatched precision seen by conventional manufacturing methods.

“We’re using well established metallurgical phenomena, but we’ve never been able to control the processes well enough to take advantage of them at this scale and at this level of detail,” said Suresh Babu, the University of Tennessee-ORNL Governor’s Chair for Advanced Manufacturing.

Continue reading at R&D Magazine.

Nursing Students Provide Care to Those with Mental Health Needs

UT graduate students in nursing, pharmacy, nutrition, and exercise physiology are coming together to tackle a new health challenge facing the nation—a critical need for advanced practice psychiatric mental health nurses.

The students, part of the College of Nursing program called Recovery-Based Interprofessional Distance Education (RIDE), are working as interprofessional teams to help clients at the Helen Ross McNabb Center live better. The program is funded by a three-year $1 million grant from Health Resources and Services Administration.

Continue reading at tntoday.utk.edu.

Monument to Harvest Season at West Tenn. Research and Education Center

Horticulturalist Jason Reeves and his team created a pumpkin display at UT’s West Tennessee Research and Education Center in Jackson. (Photo: Courtesy of Bob Hayes )

Horticulturalist Jason Reeves and his team created a pumpkin display at UT’s West Tennessee Research and Education Center in Jackson.
(Photo: Courtesy of Bob Hayes )

Jason Reeves, University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture horticulturist and research associate, and his team built a monument to harvest season at the West Tennessee Research and Education Center in Jackson. The display, comprised of more than 70 varieties of pumpkins, gourds, and winter squash, took several days to erect.

Read more at The Jackson Sun.

Study Finds Crocodiles are Sophisticated Hunters

climbing-crocs-300x202

Recent studies have found that crocodiles and their relatives are highly intelligent animals capable of sophisticated behavior such as advanced parental care, complex communication, and use of tools for hunting.

New UT research published in the journal Ethology Ecology and Evolution shows just how sophisticated their hunting techniques can be.

Vladimir Dinets, a research assistant professor in the Department of Psychology, has found that crocodiles work as a team to hunt their prey. His research tapped into the power of social media to document such behavior.

Continue reading at tntoday.utk.edu.

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